The Paradox of Sex

 

 

The paradox of sex is, that the very processes that meet the sexual needs of society has the potential to be tremendously destructive. Society has instituted moral codes to protect itself against this potential, codes that isolate people into tiny units of two. Except, the isolation of people at the grass roots level creates a poorer world that also isolates people from one another at the economic and political levels. This causes great harm. 

In isolation form one another humanity is impotent. It is easily controlled, dominated, and exploited. Also, the sexual isolation of people has proven itself to be a poor platform for meeting the human need. This is evidently the reason why prostitution has emerged almost at the outset, which is therefore rightly considered to be the world's oldest profession. Here we come upon the paradox again, because prostitution is without doubt also the world's most dangerous profession.

 

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No reliable statistics exist on how many girls, women, boys, on the street scene are seriously injured every day, and in some cases even murdered, ending up in dumpsters or in dark corners in alley ways, or on the dumping grounds outside the cities. But this, too, is not the main problem. Sex destroys people. The happy hooker is a mythical figure.

For a time, on the way to work, my path would cross the favourite strolling grounds of the local professionals. One day a beautiful looking young woman appeared on the grounds, with a smile that could met a glacier. She was well dressed, gently poised, a joy to behold. All this soon vanished. Before long her appearance became shabby her expression hash, her look cold. Her posture became slack, careless, indifferent. A while later she could no longer be seen on the grounds. Perhaps she moved away, or more likely her life may have expired in the rage of ecstasy by the hand of a fascist beast to whom she had sold herself for a few dollars.

It was astounding with what speed the transformation took place. The regression from life to death took only a few months. Countless people die in this fashion, maybe not always physically, but they die inwardly with much of the same effect. Anti-prostitution laws have so far been ineffective. Most of them punish the victims.

Equally ineffective has been the death penalty laws of ancient times when people were stoned to death for stepping across the marriage boundary to transgress the sexual isolation. In modern times no end of the sex tragedies is in sight as long as a need for it remains. The sale of sex is financially alluring to the victims, perhaps even with a sense of excitement at first. This and countless other factors make the influx of fresh victims into the trade virtually endless. Equally endless appears to be the ferocity of the pimps, and the eagerness of the Johns who fuel the game. For as long as this circus continues, born out of unsatisfied need, society suffers a great and incalculable loss.

Here the question needs to be asked whether humanity might not have been designed from the ground up with a build in paradox that causes one of its fundamental elements to become destructive to its existence. Most religions have tried to answer this question with the imposition of taboos. That this approach does not meet the apparent need for sexual intimacy is evidenced by the numerous cases of sexual abuse that the religious priesthood is accused of in the courts.

One of the answers in modern times has been to open the door to unlimited promiscuity. This gave rise to the post Vietnam War rock, drug, and sex counter culture that sprung up in many variations. Apparently, this counter culture was largely organized for political ends in order to complete the demoralization of society that the Vietnam war had been escalated for after the assassination of President Kennedy. Some of this culture still lingers on in various forms and remains as destructive as it was designed to be, rather than meeting a fundamental need.

Still, it is hard to accept that the human being, the tallest and most intelligent manifest of life in our immediate universe has come to exist with a build in paradox. "A house divided against itself cannot stand." The fact that humanity does stand, and stands tall, indicates that it is founded on a higher platform than sex. Ancient Scriptures define man as the image of God. This perception rules out any build in paradox.

That there is no build in paradox becomes apparent when one searches deeper for the fundamental principles that underlie a satisfying and productive existence. In this sphere we find a dimension that is indeed greater than sex and is equally as fundamental to human existence. This dimension unfolds as an intelligent dimension. Its principle is manifest as a commitment by people to enrich one another's existence. It creates the kind of unity, satisfaction, peace, and joy that make the world a richer place to live in, which anything focused on sex simply can't equal. The commitment to enrich one another's existence doesn't necessarily relegate sexual intimacies to the proverbial ash heap of history, or take any positive element from it. It merely sets up a higher platform where all the real needs of humanity are met. 

The principle that is expressed in enriching one another's existence is one of the key elements of physical economy as we find it manifested in the brightest eras of human history. It is central to the Greek Classical culture, the emergence of Christianity, and the unfolding of the Golden Renaissance. Its outcome is the institution of the nation state, and the technological and scientific development that unfolded through such states' constitutional commitment to the general welfare principle. 

Also in more fundamental terms, it must be recognized that humanity could not possibly have developed without its commitment to enrich one another's existence, and have achieved such a high state of civilization that presently enables 5000 times as many people to exist on this planet than the primitive cultures in distant ages could support.

Naturally, the principle to enrich one another's existence has not just a just a scientific, technological, and economic dimension. Its key element is in the social domain that supports all else in it reflection. The poet call the principle to enrich one another's existence, love. "Love is joy in the beauty of another," said the poet. In the universal sense, love is even more than that. It unfolds as joy in the beauty of life as we enrich one another's existence in life's countless dimensions.

The development path towards this larger dimension is explored in the novel "Silent War" that I created over the space of a dozen years. The development path unfolds in a love story, which in turn unfolds against the background of a political story, both of which belong to the same dimension. No economic development or political peace can be achieved without the general welfare principle as the guiding star which reflects in public policies the fundamental principle to enrich one another's life. 

The underlying principle and its public reflection develop the human potential, enrich our world, and raise civilization. In it we find the genius of humanity, humanity's creativity, and its love of beauty. The public reflection, of course, depends on what is moving at the grass roots level of individual living. So its here, in the hidden domain of its private commitment to enrich one another's existence, that society build the foundation for civilization. The joy that unfolds there, inevitably supplies a lot of the satisfaction in life that society seeks to find in sex related pursuits, though it cannot be found there because the root of satisfaction is not located there.

It is the default state, that is the failure to commit oneself to the principle of enriching one another's existence, that leaves the door open to the development of fascism. Fascism has grown at an enormous pace in recent years, as fast as the sex debacle, and more so. Modern society has embraced a death culture, it resorts to murdering people in the electric chair just as easily as it is willing to unleash nuclear war in an attempt to solve its problems. This death culture that fascism has unfurled in the minds of society precipitates society's doom. If this trend is not reversed the whole of human society will inevitably die, either in the fury of a nuclear holocaust, or in the silent whimper of regression into a long period of dark ages towards a purely feudalist world that supports but a few people.

In this war over the life and death of civilization,  the novel "From the Heart of Joy" is situated. It is focused not to take anything away, but on enriching society with some elements of fundamental truth which have been hidden for countless ages. You are invited to avail yourself of what has come to light through research during the dozen years in which the novel has been under development.

As for the question that was asked at beginning, whether there is anything greater than sex, the answer unfolds not only as a resounding yes, but brings to light one of the great riches without which human existence is unthinkable, and without which it is doomed to end? Still one cannot close the door on sex. Humanity is a sexual species and would not exist without its need for sexual interaction. The question is: does one close the door on sex because of the challenges it brings and be content to suffer the consequences? Or does one acknowledge the human need, face the sexual dimension honestly, meet it in the most ideal manner possible, and step beyond it without shutting anything down that is beautifully human? Shouldn't this be possible? Shouldn't this be the logical way to proceed?

The end

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